Sai Jun Liang


 

How did you become involved in the Chinese Progressive Association? 

I came to the U.S. in 2002, and moved to San Francisco in 2003. Because I wanted to get to know the local community, my friend, Pan Yi (a longstanding CPA leader), introduced me to CPA. I first got involved with the Proposition L campaign, a measure to support a Minimum Wage Ordinance in San Francisco,and was invited to participate in the Worker Organizing Center’s first leadership training. Since then, I have represented CPA at events and coalition building initiatives, and have participated in many of its programs and committees including the housing core group, Worker Organizing Center, and women’s group. 

What role has CPA played in your life? 

CPA has taught me the importance of civic participation and as a result, I have learned more about American society. My participation in CPA has greatly enriched my life. I have developed skills as a result of being involved with many other organizations in San Francisco, but no other organization makes me feel as internally uplifted, energized and strengthened as CPA. 

Why have you been so extensively involved with CPA? 

I strongly agree with CPA’s mission and purpose, specifically building a relationship between China and the U.S. as well as the treatment of immigrants in the United States. CPA is like a home away from home. The staff is warm and welcoming and treats members as equals. 

What role does CPA play in the community? 

Since my involvement in 2003, I have seen firsthand the important role CPA plays in the community. It is unique in that is not just about services. CPA works to ensure that we are treated fairly in all aspects of life, like in the workplace. CPA fills a gap in the Chinese community.